NASA gains insight to Mars with InSight lander

Space Science

In this undated photo made available by NASA on Thursday, July 22, 2021, clouds drift over the dome-covered SEIS seismometer of the InSight lander on the surface of Mars. The quake-measuring device is providing the first detailed look at the red planet’s interior, revealing a surprisingly thin crust and a molten core. In a series of articles published in July 2021, scientists reported that the Martian crust is within the thickness range of Earth’s. Mars’ mantle, meanwhile, is roughly half that of our own much bigger planet, while the core _ measured from the dusty surface to dead center _ is more than 1,000 miles smaller. (NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP)

MYSTERY WIRE — In this undated photo made available by NASA on Thursday, July 22, 2021, clouds drift over the dome-covered SEIS seismometer of the InSight lander on the surface of Mars.

The quake-measuring device is providing the first detailed look at the red planet’s interior, revealing a surprisingly thin crust and a molten core.

In a series of articles published in July 2021, scientists reported that the Martian crust is within the thickness range of Earth’s.

Mars’ mantle, meanwhile, is roughly half that of our own much bigger planet, while the core – measured from the dusty surface to dead center – is more than 1,000 miles smaller.

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