NASA taking another look at warp drive

Space Science

(Image: nasa.gov)

MYSTERY WIRE — Warp drives are getting another look from the U.S. government, this time it’s NASA researching the feasibility of the illusive drive.

The new NASA report on a warp drive was recently published in Popular Mechanics. The internal feasibility report suggests the agency might be working on, or at least throwing around the idea of traveling through folded space with a warp drive.

The concept of operations as described by Alcubierre is that the spacecraft would depart the point of origin (e.g. earth) using some conventional propulsion system and travel a distance d, then bring the craft to a stop relative to the departure point. The field would be turned on and the craft would zip off to its stellar destination, never locally breaking the speed of light, but covering the distance in an arbitrarily short period of time just the same.

Warp Field Mechanics 101 Dr. Harold “Sonny” White NASA Johnson Space Center

Mystery Wire has published several stories over the last few months about Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) and the man in charge of it, Luis Elizondo. Elizondo ran the AATIP program until just a few years ago when he retired. But not before requesting, and getting the government to release videos showing Navy encounters with still unidentified objects, the same videos the Department of Defense (DoD) released again in March of this year.

Back in Aug. 2008, the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) posted a solicitation for bids for money that former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid had secured that would eventually lead to funding AAWSAP. 

Weeks later, the contract was awarded to Bigelow Aerospace in North Las Vegas, the initial amount was $10 million. It required Bigelow to provide a facility that qualified for top secret work. Some of this work was to explore new ways of propulsion, such as a warp drive.

Just over a year ago, the KLAS I-Team uncovered a different government paper about warp drives that was first published in 2009.

The older paper dates back to the secretive Advanced Aerospace Weapon System Applications Program (AAWSAP). This was the Pentagon’s precursor to AATIP.

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